Our practices

Here's an overview of the principles we put into practice as we grow into the future.

 
 Seedlings nearing their time of planting.

Seedlings nearing their time of planting.

None of the "No-No's"

NO round-up ready seed
NO herbicides
NO synthetic pesticides
NO excess packaging
NO wax coating
NO gas induced ripening
NO excessive water usage

 A Praying Mantis scouting for dinner in the Curly Kale.

A Praying Mantis scouting for dinner in the Curly Kale.

Pinching out Pests

  We aim to never use pesticides to combat bug issues, instead we rely mostly on predator bugs to help control any issues that may arise, but we do handpick what we can and offer them to nearby fish.  Many bugs are mistakenly perceived as "pests", but are in fact essential to the proper growth of many crops.  However, we do reserve the right to use organic pesticides if, and only if we experience vast amounts of damage.

 Doing a walk through during winter months.  You can see snow outside of the greenhouse.

Doing a walk through during winter months.  You can see snow outside of the greenhouse.

High Tunnel Help

Currently, we operate with just one high tunnel, (green house without added heat control) which we utilize for lengthening the growing season.  We plan on erecting additional greenhouses in the near future to allow us to offer a larger bounty of locally grown food longer into the year. 

 A bumble bee hanging out on the Delphiniums.

A bumble bee hanging out on the Delphiniums.

Protecting Pollinators

As we know our beneficial pollinators have been in the decline for years.  We have experienced pollination issues first hand, and know how food production can be affected.  This, being one of the reasons why we incorporate flowering plants throughout our land, offering our critter comrades a safe haven for them to thrive.

 Robin fledgling perched on our Rubeckia.

Robin fledgling perched on our Rubeckia.

Biodynamic Benefits

  We believe in treating our farm as a whole organism, in which we are considerate of all the intricate parts working together.  From the micro-bacteria and worms in the soil, to the precious pollinators and avian friends in flight, to the farmers and the veggers; all play important roles in successfully producing good food.